Confession: I want to write about the Law of Attraction (LOA), but I’m having a difficult time getting my thoughts down. You see, some fibers of my being are in rebellion: the ones that buy into the view of the universe propounded by the Scientific Method and the reductionist science that it has wrought. Those fibers of my being scoff that LOA is at best pseudo-science and at worst a perversion of science, that LOA simply panders to wishful (or even magical) thinking, that the topic is too ‘woo’ for serious debate (which is not say that I consider my blog a venue for serious debate, but still, my ego craves credibility).

LOA is an ancient idea. Some trace it all the way back to the Emerald Tablet. It’s summed up by the saying “like attracts like” which is attributed to the 16th-century alchemist, Paracelsus. The popularity of LOA exploded in recent years due to the films What the Bleep Do We Know? and The Secret and the teachings of Abraham-Hicks.

Some have used the mysterious findings of quantum physics to assert a scientific basis to support LOA. This is because our classic view of how the world should function seems to break down at the quantum level. Experiments demonstrate that an observer effect takes hold: the expectations of the observer have a mysterious impact on the outcome of the experiment. These findings have been taken to imply that expectation has a profound effect on our everyday life: Think and Grow Rich, proponents assert.

Resources that plumb these depths from a scientific perspective include Taking the Quantum Leap by Fred Alan Wolf, The Self Aware Universe by Amit Goswami, and The Biology of Belief by Bruce Lipton.

Thinking and Growing Rich!

Now, you might argue: I think about being rich all the time and I’m not there, so clearly this doesn’t work. “Ah, but you’re not doing it right,” LOA proponents will argue. Your expectation must be an unwavering belief.

Therein lies the rub. If your belief is strong enough, you will get the desired results. If you don’t get the desired results, the flaw was in the quality of your believing. The tricky part about believing is that it consists of multi-layers. On one level you may believe, but at a subconscious level you are in doubt, and that throws the whole thing off. So, in this way, the Law of Attraction eludes proof.

A beguiling Temptress

However, if you’ve experienced the positive effects of the Law of Attraction, it is definitely a beguiling temptress. And I have been beguiled. It’s called ‘manifesting’ and it works like this:

1) You strongly hold some desire in your consciousness, the more specific the better

2) You get your whole being aligned behind the belief that you shall have it

3) It comes to pass

I have manifested jobs and homes and parking spaces. The fibers of my being that have exalted in manifesting want to kick my skeptical fibers to the curb. My optimist argues “There’s no downside!”

Even my skeptic pretty much agrees about that. The worst that could happen is that you become complacent, sitting around waiting for your new car to manifest without doing anything to make it happen (and the internet abounds with stories of people who did just that).

For me, manifesting is usually accompanied by taking ‘inspired action.’ These are often simple, creative steps, the inspiration for which comes like a lightning bolt, and the results of which are often amazing.

I once manifested an apartment and then a job in LA, in that order. The (high-paying, career-building) job was within walking distance of the apartment. I found the apartment when I was inspired to email a bunch of UCLA students that I didn’t know and inquire about sublets. So, as long as you’re actually doing something to manifest your dream, the only real downside I can see is the possibility of feeling foolish.

And I guess the possibility of feeling foolish is where my skeptical fibers are getting their hackles up. They don’t want me to look silly telling you all about the Law of Attraction. But, if it’s for real, it’s cool as shit, right? Conjuring up crazy stuff out of your imagination. I mean, in 2006 I said to myself, “I want a job but I don’t feel like conducting a job search. I just want to send my resume to someone, go on one interview and get a job.” Guess what? It worked. Exactly like I prescribed. A six-figure job, making a lot more than my previous gig.

Take LOA for a Test Drive

So, how can you see if the Law of Attraction works for you? Here’s a simple way to give it a test drive. The next time you lose something, try these simple steps.

1) Call up how it’s going to feel when you find that lost item. Remember that overriding sense of relief you felt last time you found your lost keys or wallet? That’s the feeling. Just bask in it. Turn up the heat on it to 500 degrees. This step is extremely important.

2) KNOW that you will find the lost object.

3) And here’s the hard part: Stop searching

I used this technique the other day. I had these sheets that I had been filling out by hand as part of a project. Five of the sheets were missing. I looked high and low for them. I looked on my desk, around my bed, in my files, even in the recycling. They were nowhere to be found. I thought I was going to have to do them all over again (about an hour’s worth of work). Then I tried the Art of Finding Lost Things.

The minute that I stopped the search, a thought popped into my head: I hadn’t filled out all the sheets by hand. I had filled some of them out on my computer.

The sheets weren’t missing—they were sitting on my hard drive the whole time! Doh! But see how the Law of Attraction works?

When I was in that ‘lost’ energy, I couldn’t have the thought that I wasn’t looking for a piece of paper. I had to change my consciousness to get there.

So, give it a try and tell me what you think. If you act like it’s real, it will be, right?



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